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Ben Debayle By Ben Debayle • May 18, 2015

Day In The Life: A Technology Salesman

The “Day In The Life” series is a 5-minute look into what different entry-level jobs are really like straight from the young professionals making a career in them.

7 AM: Before beginning my work day I try to get a workout in. Business development can be a grind, so working out is a stress-reliever and a great start to the day.

8 AM: Prior to heading out the door I like to review my upcoming meetings for the day, especially those that involve sales meetings or strategic partnerships. Here’s to hoping that I’ve actually scheduled all those meetings. Thankfully, GoToMeeting (a tool I use a lot) has got me covered if I have to get a conference call going or give a product demo on the fly.

8:30 AM: After making the long, curving drive up the parking garage I’m about to step out of my car and…“ding”. I get an inbox alert, and I doubt it’s someone knocking down my door for a product demo this early in the morning. Instead, it looks like someone is trying to cancel their service with us — time to save some business!

9:30 AM: After reviewing our sales numbers for the month I’m feeling the pressure to get some deals flowing through the pipeline. Every day, week, month, and quarter starts afresh in sales, which is fun but also keeps the pressure on. I’m going to reach out to some customers who love our products to see if they have any potential referrals.

10 AM: At our daily stand-up meeting with the Dev team I voice concerns that I’m hearing about the product from some of my clients. Apparently, us sales guys always give off the “everything is a critical” impression to the Dev team, but I know deep down they secretly love me.

11:30 AM: I head to lunch with a few coworkers. Lunch is the great equalizer — everyone gets hungry, no one wants to spend much money, and all in attendance feel more comfortable sharing how they really feel about that new features we’re trying to build and deliver.

1 PM: It’s demo time (wait, is it? 2 PM Eastern for the prospect means that here it’s….yup, it is) and I can’t wait to explain how we’re serving organizations all over the country. After we exchanged pleasantries and discovered that we actually met once before in person at an industry trade show, we got down to business. They ended up being interested in what they saw and have asked to trial our product. Overall, it’s a success as the deal is one step closer to being finalized.

2:30 PM: My email dings again. Apparently that customer who wanted to cancel service this morning is reconsidering. Great news, but there’s work left to be done on the call in 30 minutes.

3:30 PM: Well, I just got off the call and they’ve chosen to maintain our services. Managing relationships is difficult when there are so many to balance, but it’s important to stay in tune with those who champion your product internally at client-companies so you can avoid calls like this one.

3:45 PM: Looks like I just received a chat from a coworker that reads “Ping pong. Now. Bring it!” Challenge accepted.

4:30 PM: My last meeting of the day and it’s going to be challenging. Strategic partnerships offer a great amount of benefit, but at what cost? By the end of the meeting we’ve reached a verbal agreement to work with one another, but we’ll have to see how things play out in the future.

5:30 PM: Tonight is date night with my wife, so I better get going! Days go by fast in this role, but you have to maintain perspective and a healthy work-life balance to perform well long-term.

Things I love most: The ability to impact our company’s bottom line each day. Working with people all over the country and at times internationally. Having the opportunity to relax in the middle of the day over a friendly game of ping pong. Leaving the office knowing that my managers believe in me and continue to increase my level of responsibility.

About the author: Stephen works as an Inside Salesmen for a growing Technology Company in Dallas, TX. He graduated with a degree in information systems.